Are you ready to make the jump to social customer care?

2016-1096_engagor_02-8_social_customer_careJust a few years back, there was only a select group of forward-thinking companies (the KLMs, Zappos and Kate Spades of the world) that decided to take on social customer care. Their plunge into providing quality service through social media was seen as visionary and cutting-edge among industry leaders. Nowadays, a lot of businesses have jumped on the social customer care bandwagon as it has become a standard. However, even today it can take a critical event to trigger a company to get fully on board.

When do companies usually notice the importance of social customer care?

1. They have their own moment of crisis. Unfortunately, many businesses only fully understand the importance of social customer care when it’s already too late. There is an old business expression: “It takes years to build a strong, confident image, and just minutes (or even seconds) to destroy it.” In social media’s public eye, the impact of a crisis has quadrupled that effect.

Countless businesses across the globe can attest to the fact that disgruntled customers are merciless when you ignore their complaints on social. When a crisis catches them off guard, they quickly drum up the resources and tools to help support their efforts out of fear of causing more damage.

2. A competitor deals with a crisis that disrupts their business. Another key motivator that usually wins companies over is when a competitor deals with a huge crisis. Let’s take the example of the recent Volkswagen falsified emissions scandal: for the automotive industry, the scandal has been a huge trigger to leverage social media to manage customer sentiment.

Handling a crisis is not about pulling out the big guns, it’s those small actions and one-on-one conversations that prove you’re willing to go the extra mile for each customer. When businesses notice competitors are lagging behind, alarms bells go off and they no longer neglect the power of using social customer care to gain an edge over competition.

3. They want to prepare for when a crisis strikes. Luckily, there are companies that don’t need a wake-up call in the form of a worst case scenario turned into reality to help recognise the importance. Beyond using social to handle customer queries and complaints, they acknowledge the value of social media to provide customers with real-time information during a moment of crisis.

For those companies, instead of having one specific trigger, it’s usually a mix of elements (e.g. large inflow of mentions, heavy competition, likelihood to churn, etc.) that gets them on board.

Don’t wait until it’s too late to start allocating resources and building a social customer care team. To take the leap, make sure you’re calling the shots instead of having a crisis become the trigger.

The post Are you ready to make the jump to social customer care? appeared first on Engagor.

Best Practices For Building A Social Customer Care Team

2016-1005_engagor_blog_social_cc_teamMissing an angry customer’s tweets or taking too much time to respond to customers on social quickly turns into losing customers–and ruining your business. Unfortunately, many brands are still behind the curve when it comes to effectively managing questions and complaints.

To efficiently handle a large influx of social media messages and prioritize which ones need a reply (and which don’t), you need a team of social media superheroes.

What are some of the best practices for building a kick-ass social customer care team?

1. Align goals across the company. Don’t jump into social customer care too quickly. First, before you start building your social media team, make sure your goals are closely aligned with the entire organization. You won’t believe how much valuable know-how your colleagues from other departments will have to share! At a later stage, as you’re mastering social customer care, you can even think about providing your colleagues with access to your social customer care tool.

2. Recruit people internally. Don’t search too far for people to staff your social media team; look for social media-savvy employees in your company that already posses a level of product knowledge. In a later stage, you can expand your team and/or optimize workflows as your workload increases.

3. Divide and lighten your team’s workload. If you want to achieve immediate success and become highly cost-effective, make sure you divide and conquer the case load quickly. Depending on what’s most useful to your company, make the distinction between first and second-line social customer care. First-line social customer care agents have a general product knowledge. Second-line care agents process more technical background knowledge.

4. Identify & resolve pain points. Clearly communicate your team’s targets and be as transparent as possible on the goals each team member has to achieve. Document these goals (e.g. “What is the response time each team member should strive towards?”), and manage your team members’ expectations as you go to improve efficiency and ensure quality responses.

5. Implement customer feedback. Don’t just promise you will implement your customers’ feedback on social, prove you can act on it too! Close the loop with your customers. A good way to start is to build out your FAQ and online knowledge hub. Allow customers to help themselves out (or even help each other out with the help of a community forum) with self-service customer support–you will be amazed by how much this will lighten your load.

Your business can no longer afford to ignore social customer care. To build a winning social customer care team and achieve the most success, you need the right process, the right people, and the right products.

Download our new eBook, “Building A Social Customer Care Team” for even more tips on how to build social customer care teams who communicate meaningfully and engage confidently with customers.

2016-1005_clarabridge_blog_social_cc_team_cta

The post Best Practices For Building A Social Customer Care Team appeared first on Engagor.

Best Practices For Building A Social Customer Care Team

2016-1005_engagor_blog_social_cc_teamMissing an angry customer’s tweets or taking too much time to respond to customers on social quickly turns into losing customers–and ruining your business. Unfortunately, many brands are still behind the curve when it comes to effectively managing questions and complaints.

To efficiently handle a large influx of social media messages and prioritize which ones need a reply (and which don’t), you need a team of social media superheroes.

What are some of the best practices for building a kick-ass social customer care team?

1. Align goals across the company. Don’t jump into social customer care too quickly. First, before you start building your social media team, make sure your goals are closely aligned with the entire organization. You won’t believe how much valuable know-how your colleagues from other departments will have to share! At a later stage, as you’re mastering social customer care, you can even think about providing your colleagues with access to your social customer care tool.

2. Recruit people internally. Don’t search too far for people to staff your social media team; look for social media-savvy employees in your company that already posses a level of product knowledge. In a later stage, you can expand your team and/or optimize workflows as your workload increases.

3. Divide and lighten your team’s workload. If you want to achieve immediate success and become highly cost-effective, make sure you divide and conquer the case load quickly. Depending on what’s most useful to your company, make the distinction between first and second-line social customer care. First-line social customer care agents have a general product knowledge. Second-line care agents process more technical background knowledge.

4. Identify & resolve pain points. Clearly communicate your team’s targets and be as transparent as possible on the goals each team member has to achieve. Document these goals (e.g. “What is the response time each team member should strive towards?”), and manage your team members’ expectations as you go to improve efficiency and ensure quality responses.

5. Implement customer feedback. Don’t just promise you will implement your customers’ feedback on social, prove you can act on it too! Close the loop with your customers. A good way to start is to build out your FAQ and online knowledge hub. Allow customers to help themselves out (or even help each other out with the help of a community forum) with self-service customer support–you will be amazed by how much this will lighten your load.

Your business can no longer afford to ignore social customer care. To build a winning social customer care team and achieve the most success, you need the right process, the right people, and the right products.

Download our new eBook, “Building A Social Customer Care Team” for even more tips on how to build social customer care teams who communicate meaningfully and engage confidently with customers.

2016-1005_clarabridge_blog_social_cc_team_cta

The post Best Practices For Building A Social Customer Care Team appeared first on Engagor.

Best Practices For Building A Social Customer Care Team

2016-1005_engagor_blog_social_cc_teamMissing an angry customer’s tweets or taking too much time to respond to customers on social quickly turns into losing customers–and ruining your business. Unfortunately, many brands are still behind the curve when it comes to effectively managing questions and complaints.

To efficiently handle a large influx of social media messages and prioritize which ones need a reply (and which don’t), you need a team of social media superheroes.

What are some of the best practices for building a kick-ass social customer care team?

1. Align goals across the company. Don’t jump into social customer care too quickly. First, before you start building your social media team, make sure your goals are closely aligned with the entire organization. You won’t believe how much valuable know-how your colleagues from other departments will have to share! At a later stage, as you’re mastering social customer care, you can even think about providing your colleagues with access to your social customer care tool.

2. Recruit people internally. Don’t search too far for people to staff your social media team; look for social media-savvy employees in your company that already posses a level of product knowledge. In a later stage, you can expand your team and/or optimize workflows as your workload increases.

3. Divide and lighten your team’s workload. If you want to achieve immediate success and become highly cost-effective, make sure you divide and conquer the case load quickly. Depending on what’s most useful to your company, make the distinction between first and second-line social customer care. First-line social customer care agents have a general product knowledge. Second-line care agents process more technical background knowledge.

4. Identify & resolve pain points. Clearly communicate your team’s targets and be as transparent as possible on the goals each team member has to achieve. Document these goals (e.g. “What is the response time each team member should strive towards?”), and manage your team members’ expectations as you go to improve efficiency and ensure quality responses.

5. Implement customer feedback. Don’t just promise you will implement your customers’ feedback on social, prove you can act on it too! Close the loop with your customers. A good way to start is to build out your FAQ and online knowledge hub. Allow customers to help themselves out (or even help each other out with the help of a community forum) with self-service customer support–you will be amazed by how much this will lighten your load.

Your business can no longer afford to ignore social customer care. To build a winning social customer care team and achieve the most success, you need the right process, the right people, and the right products.

Download our new eBook, “Building A Social Customer Care Team” for even more tips on how to build social customer care teams who communicate meaningfully and engage confidently with customers.

2016-1005_clarabridge_blog_social_cc_team_cta

The post Best Practices For Building A Social Customer Care Team appeared first on Engagor.

Best Practices For Building A Social Customer Care Team

2016-1005_engagor_blog_social_cc_teamMissing an angry customer’s tweets or taking too much time to respond to customers on social quickly turns into losing customers–and ruining your business. Unfortunately, many brands are still behind the curve when it comes to effectively managing questions and complaints.

To efficiently handle a large influx of social media messages and prioritize which ones need a reply (and which don’t), you need a team of social media superheroes.

What are some of the best practices for building a kick-ass social customer care team?

1. Align goals across the company. Don’t jump into social customer care too quickly. First, before you start building your social media team, make sure your goals are closely aligned with the entire organization. You won’t believe how much valuable know-how your colleagues from other departments will have to share! At a later stage, as you’re mastering social customer care, you can even think about providing your colleagues with access to your social customer care tool.

2. Recruit people internally. Don’t search too far for people to staff your social media team; look for social media-savvy employees in your company that already posses a level of product knowledge. In a later stage, you can expand your team and/or optimize workflows as your workload increases.

3. Divide and lighten your team’s workload. If you want to achieve immediate success and become highly cost-effective, make sure you divide and conquer the case load quickly. Depending on what’s most useful to your company, make the distinction between first and second-line social customer care. First-line social customer care agents have a general product knowledge. Second-line care agents process more technical background knowledge.

4. Identify & resolve pain points. Clearly communicate your team’s targets and be as transparent as possible on the goals each team member has to achieve. Document these goals (e.g. “What is the response time each team member should strive towards?”), and manage your team members’ expectations as you go to improve efficiency and ensure quality responses.

5. Implement customer feedback. Don’t just promise you will implement your customers’ feedback on social, prove you can act on it too! Close the loop with your customers. A good way to start is to build out your FAQ and online knowledge hub. Allow customers to help themselves out (or even help each other out with the help of a community forum) with self-service customer support–you will be amazed by how much this will lighten your load.

Your business can no longer afford to ignore social customer care. To build a winning social customer care team and achieve the most success, you need the right process, the right people, and the right products.

Download our new eBook, “Building A Social Customer Care Team” for even more tips on how to build social customer care teams who communicate meaningfully and engage confidently with customers.

2016-1005_clarabridge_blog_social_cc_team_cta

The post Best Practices For Building A Social Customer Care Team appeared first on Engagor.

Best Practices For Building A Social Customer Care Team

2016-1005_engagor_blog_social_cc_teamMissing an angry customer’s tweets or taking too much time to respond to customers on social quickly turns into losing customers–and ruining your business. Unfortunately, many brands are still behind the curve when it comes to effectively managing questions and complaints.

To efficiently handle a large influx of social media messages and prioritize which ones need a reply (and which don’t), you need a team of social media superheroes.

What are some of the best practices for building a kick-ass social customer care team?

1. Align goals across the company. Don’t jump into social customer care too quickly. First, before you start building your social media team, make sure your goals are closely aligned with the entire organization. You won’t believe how much valuable know-how your colleagues from other departments will have to share! At a later stage, as you’re mastering social customer care, you can even think about providing your colleagues with access to your social customer care tool.

2. Recruit people internally. Don’t search too far for people to staff your social media team; look for social media-savvy employees in your company that already posses a level of product knowledge. In a later stage, you can expand your team and/or optimize workflows as your workload increases.

3. Divide and lighten your team’s workload. If you want to achieve immediate success and become highly cost-effective, make sure you divide and conquer the case load quickly. Depending on what’s most useful to your company, make the distinction between first and second-line social customer care. First-line social customer care agents have a general product knowledge. Second-line care agents process more technical background knowledge.

4. Identify & resolve pain points. Clearly communicate your team’s targets and be as transparent as possible on the goals each team member has to achieve. Document these goals (e.g. “What is the response time each team member should strive towards?”), and manage your team members’ expectations as you go to improve efficiency and ensure quality responses.

5. Implement customer feedback. Don’t just promise you will implement your customers’ feedback on social, prove you can act on it too! Close the loop with your customers. A good way to start is to build out your FAQ and online knowledge hub. Allow customers to help themselves out (or even help each other out with the help of a community forum) with self-service customer support–you will be amazed by how much this will lighten your load.

Your business can no longer afford to ignore social customer care. To build a winning social customer care team and achieve the most success, you need the right process, the right people, and the right products.

Download our new eBook, “Building A Social Customer Care Team” for even more tips on how to build social customer care teams who communicate meaningfully and engage confidently with customers.

2016-1005_clarabridge_blog_social_cc_team_cta

The post Best Practices For Building A Social Customer Care Team appeared first on Engagor.

Best Practices For Building A Social Customer Care Team

2016-1005_engagor_blog_social_cc_teamMissing an angry customer’s tweets or taking too much time to respond to customers on social quickly turns into losing customers–and ruining your business. Unfortunately, many brands are still behind the curve when it comes to effectively managing questions and complaints.

To efficiently handle a large influx of social media messages and prioritize which ones need a reply (and which don’t), you need a team of social media superheroes.

What are some of the best practices for building a kick-ass social customer care team?

1. Align goals across the company. Don’t jump into social customer care too quickly. First, before you start building your social media team, make sure your goals are closely aligned with the entire organization. You won’t believe how much valuable know-how your colleagues from other departments will have to share! At a later stage, as you’re mastering social customer care, you can even think about providing your colleagues with access to your social customer care tool.

2. Recruit people internally. Don’t search too far for people to staff your social media team; look for social media-savvy employees in your company that already posses a level of product knowledge. In a later stage, you can expand your team and/or optimize workflows as your workload increases.

3. Divide and lighten your team’s workload. If you want to achieve immediate success and become highly cost-effective, make sure you divide and conquer the case load quickly. Depending on what’s most useful to your company, make the distinction between first and second-line social customer care. First-line social customer care agents have a general product knowledge. Second-line care agents process more technical background knowledge.

4. Identify & resolve pain points. Clearly communicate your team’s targets and be as transparent as possible on the goals each team member has to achieve. Document these goals (e.g. “What is the response time each team member should strive towards?”), and manage your team members’ expectations as you go to improve efficiency and ensure quality responses.

5. Implement customer feedback. Don’t just promise you will implement your customers’ feedback on social, prove you can act on it too! Close the loop with your customers. A good way to start is to build out your FAQ and online knowledge hub. Allow customers to help themselves out (or even help each other out with the help of a community forum) with self-service customer support–you will be amazed by how much this will lighten your load.

Your business can no longer afford to ignore social customer care. To build a winning social customer care team and achieve the most success, you need the right process, the right people, and the right products.

Download our new eBook, “Building A Social Customer Care Team” for even more tips on how to build social customer care teams who communicate meaningfully and engage confidently with customers.

2016-1005_clarabridge_blog_social_cc_team_cta

The post Best Practices For Building A Social Customer Care Team appeared first on Engagor.

How to Prioritize On Urgent Social Media Messages

2014-1043_clarabridge_blog_01-18_prioritize_socialNowadays, responding to every incoming social media message that needs an action should be your priority. Every customer reaching out to your business through social is an opportunity to demonstrate your level of commitment to delivering a great experience.

In the social space there are many moments with a clear level of urgency. Due to the massive overload of incoming social messages, crisis situations can quickly overwhelm your entire social customer care team. Usually, this is an “all hands on deck” situation. To help you smoothly handle this situation and focus on what really matters, you need a well-defined triage process.

Identify Keywords That Predict A Level Of Urgency

First, identify and search for those keywords that predict a level of urgency. For example, an Engagor customer in the utilities industry has identified keywords like ‘blackout’, ‘electrical breakdown’, ‘short-circuiting’, etc. Usually, when a lot of people start talking about the same keywords during a short period of time, this is a clear trigger a crisis situation is at hand.

Think about every worst case scenario that might cause serious damage to your business and your customers. Airline companies might search for multiple scenarios like ‘crash’, ‘hijacking’, etc. in relation to their brand to capture everything that’s relevant. In some cases, identifying the right keywords and being to quickly assess a crisis situation in the moment (which is possible via social more than any other communication channel) might even saves precious lives!

Set Up Automation Recipes & Alerts to Notify You At Times of Urgency

On social, one of the worst things that can happen is when messages slip through the cracks. Now that you’ve identified the right keywords, you need to make sure you’re instantly up-to-date. Social media never sleeps–with mobile push notifications and email alerts, you can receive a notification that enables you to quickly assess a situation and streamline communication.

With Engagor, this is possible by using automation recipes. You can, for example, create a recipe that sends a mobile push notification or email alert each time you’re pulling in a hundred messages in under 15 minutes. This sudden spike in volume might be a serious trigger for a crisis. Each time your incoming data matches these criteria you will receive instant alerts through email and your mobile phone. Messages that match certain criteria can also be routed to a specific mailbox to respond to all urgent messages from just one place.

Also, take the opportunity to create automation recipes to route messages to a specific mailbox when, for example, an important journalist or a key stakeholder tweets about your company.

On social, crisis situations can escalate easily. Anticipate different crisis scenarios before they quickly run out of hand. Get a grip on your social media messages and create automations to quickly route messages to the right people and make sure you still meet your SLAs, even in times of urgency.

The post How to Prioritize On Urgent Social Media Messages appeared first on Engagor.

Essential Items For Your 2016 Social Customer Service Policy

clarabridge_blog_01-11_engagor_social_customer_serviceSocial customer care is no longer a competitive advantage– it’s become a necessity. As more and more companies take on a social customer care program, you must keep your social customer service policy up to standard to get ahead of the game.

Which essential elements should you include in your social customer service policy in 2016?

1. Identify The Agent Who Is Handling

Even if Twitter’s character limit expands beyond 140, every word (and even every punctuation mark) will still count. Make it part of your social customer service policy to have your agents “sign” their replies with their name. This way, your customers will know who they’re talking to. Responses are more personalized when agents add their names or initials at the end of each tweet.

Some other items you can include to make your conversations more personalized:

  • Address every customer with their name (if possible) and greet them with a simple “Hi!” with every first interaction.
  • How are customers talking to you? Try to use the words and expressions that would resonate with that specific customers while still remaining true to your brand.

2. If Possible, Move Conversations to A Private Room

This won’t really come to a surprise: customers value their privacy– a lot. The huge uprise and continued success of messaging apps like Snapchat, WhatsApp, and Facebook Messenger that marked recent years prove that customers value one-on-one conversations without the whole world to see. Especially when it comes to sharing private information! Customers really love to chat one-on-one and the same goes for having a conversation with a business. So if possible, move conversations to Direct or Private Messages. Especially on Twitter, DMs allow conversations to flow smoothly and openly. You can bet on it– your customers will really appreciate your efforts in understanding what they really need.

3. Set SLAs For The Number of Replies

In 2016, it will be even more important to value your customers’ time. Try to limit the number of replies to only two per customer case. First, acknowledge the complaint or question. Second, come back to that customer and resolve concerns. Don’t feel bad when you fail to meet your SLA. Setting SLAs for the number of replies will serve as a framework to help you quickly problem-solve complaints. Your agents are only human and some questions are more complex than others, requiring you to do more legwork than normally.

Bear in mind that, although your customers are multi-channel, it’s unacceptable to redirect your customers to another customer care channel (e.g. chat, email, phone, etc.) while you’re in a conversation. Customers don’t care how you handle complaints behind-the-scenes and involve multiple departments to resolve a case. They only care about being helped out with a personalized, high-quality service. If a customer reaches out through social first, directing him to email is a definite no-go!

4. Rethink Your Rules of Engagement

There are many situations where you need to apply your rules of engagement in a strict manner. Several Engagor customers filter out profanity (e.g. swear words) and trolls because it’s part of their rules of engagement not to respond to those kind of conversations. Don’t let profanity or trolls clutter up your inbox, nor invest your time and energy in responding to them.

Keep in mind that data that includes profanity or trolls can be valuable to report on. For example, in the case of trolls, you still need to keep track of that data if you want to take legal steps.

Conclusion

If your business wants to truly reap the benefits of a social customer program, make sure you understand your customers’ needs and wants. Change or add elements to your social customer service policy as you go. Make it your mission for this year to strive towards excellence. As many brands have taken on a social customer care program, it will be the small details that make you stand out.

The post Essential Items For Your 2016 Social Customer Service Policy appeared first on Engagor.

Essential Items For Your 2016 Social Customer Service Policy

clarabridge_blog_01-11_engagor_social_customer_serviceSocial customer care is no longer a competitive advantage– it’s become a necessity. As more and more companies take on a social customer care program, you must keep your social customer service policy up to standard to get ahead of the game.

Which essential elements should you include in your social customer service policy in 2016?

1. Identify The Agent Who Is Handling

Even if Twitter’s character limit expands beyond 140, every word (and even every punctuation mark) will still count. Make it part of your social customer service policy to have your agents “sign” their replies with their name. This way, your customers will know who they’re talking to. Responses are more personalized when agents add their names or initials at the end of each tweet.

Some other items you can include to make your conversations more personalized:

  • Address every customer with their name (if possible) and greet them with a simple “Hi!” with every first interaction.
  • How are customers talking to you? Try to use the words and expressions that would resonate with that specific customers while still remaining true to your brand.

2. If Possible, Move Conversations to A Private Room

This won’t really come to a surprise: customers value their privacy– a lot. The huge uprise and continued success of messaging apps like Snapchat, WhatsApp, and Facebook Messenger that marked recent years prove that customers value one-on-one conversations without the whole world to see. Especially when it comes to sharing private information! Customers really love to chat one-on-one and the same goes for having a conversation with a business. So if possible, move conversations to Direct or Private Messages. Especially on Twitter, DMs allow conversations to flow smoothly and openly. You can bet on it– your customers will really appreciate your efforts in understanding what they really need.

3. Set SLAs For The Number of Replies

In 2016, it will be even more important to value your customers’ time. Try to limit the number of replies to only two per customer case. First, acknowledge the complaint or question. Second, come back to that customer and resolve concerns. Don’t feel bad when you fail to meet your SLA. Setting SLAs for the number of replies will serve as a framework to help you quickly problem-solve complaints. Your agents are only human and some questions are more complex than others, requiring you to do more legwork than normally.

Bear in mind that, although your customers are multi-channel, it’s unacceptable to redirect your customers to another customer care channel (e.g. chat, email, phone, etc.) while you’re in a conversation. Customers don’t care how you handle complaints behind-the-scenes and involve multiple departments to resolve a case. They only care about being helped out with a personalized, high-quality service. If a customer reaches out through social first, directing him to email is a definite no-go!

4. Rethink Your Rules of Engagement

There are many situations where you need to apply your rules of engagement in a strict manner. Several Engagor customers filter out profanity (e.g. swear words) and trolls because it’s part of their rules of engagement not to respond to those kind of conversations. Don’t let profanity or trolls clutter up your inbox, nor invest your time and energy in responding to them.

Keep in mind that data that includes profanity or trolls can be valuable to report on. For example, in the case of trolls, you still need to keep track of that data if you want to take legal steps.

Conclusion

If your business wants to truly reap the benefits of a social customer program, make sure you understand your customers’ needs and wants. Change or add elements to your social customer service policy as you go. Make it your mission for this year to strive towards excellence. As many brands have taken on a social customer care program, it will be the small details that make you stand out.

The post Essential Items For Your 2016 Social Customer Service Policy appeared first on Engagor.

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