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5 Great Alternatives to 24/7 Social Customer Service

Customers are making key buying decisions based on the interactions they have with brands on social media. Twitter and Facebook are always on putting customers just one click away from being able to reach out with complaints, questions, etc. However, for quite a number of brands, it’s not possible to ‘always be on’ with 24/7 customer support. The lack of resources often prevents them from hiring extra people to take care of the night and weekend shifts.

How can you manage conversations with your customers if 24/7, round-the-clock support isn’t feasible? How can you still manage to exceed the expectations of your customers?

Take a look at these 5 great alternatives to make sure you can still deliver smooth customer interactions over the weekend, during and outside peak hours, and those make or break crisis moments.

1. Being Active When Your Audience Is

It’s as simple as that: just be active when your audience is.

The hours your audience is talking to your brand greatly determines when you yourself need to be actively replying to your customers’ questions. Those hours, when you need to be available, typically depend on the industry you’re in. To get to the bottom of this, you need to monitor when your community is active. Are they usually talking to you during the morning/evening/at night? If this is still a mystery to you, you will quickly understand when you need to provide customer service.

Important Tip: If your brand operates internationally and works with multiple social media teams across the globe, go beyond simply monitoring. Filter on country or language to be able to sift through the data so that each social media team only sees what’s relevant to them.

Still not sure whether you need to provide customer support during the weekend? If that’s when your community is most active, then the answer is, “Yes of course!” If you notice inflow is rather low on Saturday, and especially on Sunday, you can put someone on standby or exclude the weekend from your business hours.

2. Providing Back-Up During Peaks & Crisis Situations

At some points throughout the day, and even throughout the year, there are more conversations than usual. In those cases, outsourcing a part of the work to lighten the load is the perfect alternative to cover periods of time when there’s a significantly higher volume of messages. In the case of telecom companies, for example, they often call upon extra pairs of hands in sudden crisis situations (e.g. failing network connections, total outages, and so forth).

Important Tip: Create special, dynamic forums where you can post regular status updates in times of crisis. As a type of self-service customer care, direct your community to it with helpful links.

3. Being Flexible in Time & Space

In any customer service environment, flexibility is key. It’s a crucial characteristic for employers and employees alike. It really works both ways: the more flexibility you grant employees, the more they will be motivated to do a great job and be flexible in return. That’s why you need to be flexible both in time and space.

Develop trust and reliability with your social media team. If small changes need to be made in people’s schedules, employees need to be flexible enough to step in and switch shifts from time to time. Working with shifts is a great way to provide regular breaks so people have enough time to decompress.

In a lot of cases, the option to work from home is a great alternative to make sure shifts are easily covered. Introducing a BYOD policy (i.e. employees have their own laptop at their disposal) allows employees to work remotely. This is very useful if you want people to work standby during the weekend. Introduce mobile devices and mobile apps, to work on/with either at home or at the office, to provide customer care on the go.

4. Business Hours Don’t Equal Working Hours

Stress is commonplace in a social customer service environment. High volumes of messages need to be dealt with in a timely manner if brands want to meet their targets. When starting a new day, messages have piled up during the night, and there’s usually a higher workload. Brands should create work schemes in terms of workload and not in terms of business hours.

Start half an hour earlier than usual to easily catch up on the messages that filtered into the social inbox during the previous night. After this change, you will easily notice an immediate, positive impact on stress level and response times.

5. Clearly Communicate the Service You Offer

Customers should know what to expect from the service you deliver. What better way to do this than to give your Twitter bio a crucial makeover? The way you describe yourself online says a lot about how you provide customer service, and ultimately, how you do business.

Here are 5 essential elements to include in your Twitter bio to make sure customers know what to expect:

  • include customer care, customer support, or comparable term in your Twitter name
  • state that you deliver customer service in your Twitter bio (e.g. “Customer care team, at your service!”)
  • include business hours: customers need to know when they can access you through social media (e.g. 8am – 8pm, Monday through Friday)
  • communicate about other support channels, and have an alternative available (e.g. website, chat, phone, email, etc.)
  • give your company a human face, and let people know who is part of your social customer care team

Want to learn more about these alternatives in-depth? Don’t hesitate to check out our dedicated eBook to make sure you’re maximizing your social customer service efforts.

The post 5 Great Alternatives to 24/7 Social Customer Service appeared first on Engagor.

5 Great Alternatives to 24/7 Social Customer Service

Customers are making key buying decisions based on the interactions they have with brands on social media. Twitter and Facebook are always on putting customers just one click away from being able to reach out with complaints, questions, etc. However, for quite a number of brands, it’s not possible to ‘always be on’ with 24/7 customer support. The lack of resources often prevents them from hiring extra people to take care of the night and weekend shifts.

How can you manage conversations with your customers if 24/7, round-the-clock support isn’t feasible? How can you still manage to exceed the expectations of your customers?

Take a look at these 5 great alternatives to make sure you can still deliver smooth customer interactions over the weekend, during and outside peak hours, and those make or break crisis moments.

1. Being Active When Your Audience Is

It’s as simple as that: just be active when your audience is.

The hours your audience is talking to your brand greatly determines when you yourself need to be actively replying to your customers’ questions. Those hours, when you need to be available, typically depend on the industry you’re in. To get to the bottom of this, you need to monitor when your community is active. Are they usually talking to you during the morning/evening/at night? If this is still a mystery to you, you will quickly understand when you need to provide customer service.

Important Tip: If your brand operates internationally and works with multiple social media teams across the globe, go beyond simply monitoring. Filter on country or language to be able to sift through the data so that each social media team only sees what’s relevant to them.

Still not sure whether you need to provide customer support during the weekend? If that’s when your community is most active, then the answer is, “Yes of course!” If you notice inflow is rather low on Saturday, and especially on Sunday, you can put someone on standby or exclude the weekend from your business hours.

2. Providing Back-Up During Peaks & Crisis Situations

At some points throughout the day, and even throughout the year, there are more conversations than usual. In those cases, outsourcing a part of the work to lighten the load is the perfect alternative to cover periods of time when there’s a significantly higher volume of messages. In the case of telecom companies, for example, they often call upon extra pairs of hands in sudden crisis situations (e.g. failing network connections, total outages, and so forth).

Important Tip: Create special, dynamic forums where you can post regular status updates in times of crisis. As a type of self-service customer care, direct your community to it with helpful links.

3. Being Flexible in Time & Space

In any customer service environment, flexibility is key. It’s a crucial characteristic for employers and employees alike. It really works both ways: the more flexibility you grant employees, the more they will be motivated to do a great job and be flexible in return. That’s why you need to be flexible both in time and space.

Develop trust and reliability with your social media team. If small changes need to be made in people’s schedules, employees need to be flexible enough to step in and switch shifts from time to time. Working with shifts is a great way to provide regular breaks so people have enough time to decompress.

In a lot of cases, the option to work from home is a great alternative to make sure shifts are easily covered. Introducing a BYOD policy (i.e. employees have their own laptop at their disposal) allows employees to work remotely. This is very useful if you want people to work standby during the weekend. Introduce mobile devices and mobile apps, to work on/with either at home or at the office, to provide customer care on the go.

4. Business Hours Don’t Equal Working Hours

Stress is commonplace in a social customer service environment. High volumes of messages need to be dealt with in a timely manner if brands want to meet their targets. When starting a new day, messages have piled up during the night, and there’s usually a higher workload. Brands should create work schemes in terms of workload and not in terms of business hours.

Start half an hour earlier than usual to easily catch up on the messages that filtered into the social inbox during the previous night. After this change, you will easily notice an immediate, positive impact on stress level and response times.

5. Clearly Communicate the Service You Offer

Customers should know what to expect from the service you deliver. What better way to do this than to give your Twitter bio a crucial makeover? The way you describe yourself online says a lot about how you provide customer service, and ultimately, how you do business.

Here are 5 essential elements to include in your Twitter bio to make sure customers know what to expect:

  • include customer care, customer support, or comparable term in your Twitter name
  • state that you deliver customer service in your Twitter bio (e.g. “Customer care team, at your service!”)
  • include business hours: customers need to know when they can access you through social media (e.g. 8am – 8pm, Monday through Friday)
  • communicate about other support channels, and have an alternative available (e.g. website, chat, phone, email, etc.)
  • give your company a human face, and let people know who is part of your social customer care team

Want to learn more about these alternatives in-depth? Don’t hesitate to check out our dedicated eBook to make sure you’re maximizing your social customer service efforts.

The post 5 Great Alternatives to 24/7 Social Customer Service appeared first on Engagor.

5 Great Alternatives to 24/7 Social Customer Service

Customers are making key buying decisions based on the interactions they have with brands on social media. Twitter and Facebook are always on putting customers just one click away from being able to reach out with complaints, questions, etc. However, for quite a number of brands, it’s not possible to ‘always be on’ with 24/7 customer support. The lack of resources often prevents them from hiring extra people to take care of the night and weekend shifts.

How can you manage conversations with your customers if 24/7, round-the-clock support isn’t feasible? How can you still manage to exceed the expectations of your customers?

Take a look at these 5 great alternatives to make sure you can still deliver smooth customer interactions over the weekend, during and outside peak hours, and those make or break crisis moments.

1. Being Active When Your Audience Is

It’s as simple as that: just be active when your audience is.

The hours your audience is talking to your brand greatly determines when you yourself need to be actively replying to your customers’ questions. Those hours, when you need to be available, typically depend on the industry you’re in. To get to the bottom of this, you need to monitor when your community is active. Are they usually talking to you during the morning/evening/at night? If this is still a mystery to you, you will quickly understand when you need to provide customer service.

Important Tip: If your brand operates internationally and works with multiple social media teams across the globe, go beyond simply monitoring. Filter on country or language to be able to sift through the data so that each social media team only sees what’s relevant to them.

Still not sure whether you need to provide customer support during the weekend? If that’s when your community is most active, then the answer is, “Yes of course!” If you notice inflow is rather low on Saturday, and especially on Sunday, you can put someone on standby or exclude the weekend from your business hours.

2. Providing Back-Up During Peaks & Crisis Situations

At some points throughout the day, and even throughout the year, there are more conversations than usual. In those cases, outsourcing a part of the work to lighten the load is the perfect alternative to cover periods of time when there’s a significantly higher volume of messages. In the case of telecom companies, for example, they often call upon extra pairs of hands in sudden crisis situations (e.g. failing network connections, total outages, and so forth).

Important Tip: Create special, dynamic forums where you can post regular status updates in times of crisis. As a type of self-service customer care, direct your community to it with helpful links.

3. Being Flexible in Time & Space

In any customer service environment, flexibility is key. It’s a crucial characteristic for employers and employees alike. It really works both ways: the more flexibility you grant employees, the more they will be motivated to do a great job and be flexible in return. That’s why you need to be flexible both in time and space.

Develop trust and reliability with your social media team. If small changes need to be made in people’s schedules, employees need to be flexible enough to step in and switch shifts from time to time. Working with shifts is a great way to provide regular breaks so people have enough time to decompress.

In a lot of cases, the option to work from home is a great alternative to make sure shifts are easily covered. Introducing a BYOD policy (i.e. employees have their own laptop at their disposal) allows employees to work remotely. This is very useful if you want people to work standby during the weekend. Introduce mobile devices and mobile apps, to work on/with either at home or at the office, to provide customer care on the go.

4. Business Hours Don’t Equal Working Hours

Stress is commonplace in a social customer service environment. High volumes of messages need to be dealt with in a timely manner if brands want to meet their targets. When starting a new day, messages have piled up during the night, and there’s usually a higher workload. Brands should create work schemes in terms of workload and not in terms of business hours.

Start half an hour earlier than usual to easily catch up on the messages that filtered into the social inbox during the previous night. After this change, you will easily notice an immediate, positive impact on stress level and response times.

5. Clearly Communicate the Service You Offer

Customers should know what to expect from the service you deliver. What better way to do this than to give your Twitter bio a crucial makeover? The way you describe yourself online says a lot about how you provide customer service, and ultimately, how you do business.

Here are 5 essential elements to include in your Twitter bio to make sure customers know what to expect:

  • include customer care, customer support, or comparable term in your Twitter name
  • state that you deliver customer service in your Twitter bio (e.g. “Customer care team, at your service!”)
  • include business hours: customers need to know when they can access you through social media (e.g. 8am – 8pm, Monday through Friday)
  • communicate about other support channels, and have an alternative available (e.g. website, chat, phone, email, etc.)
  • give your company a human face, and let people know who is part of your social customer care team

Want to learn more about these alternatives in-depth? Don’t hesitate to check out our dedicated eBook to make sure you’re maximizing your social customer service efforts.

The post 5 Great Alternatives to 24/7 Social Customer Service appeared first on Engagor.

5 Great Alternatives to 24/7 Social Customer Service

Customers are making key buying decisions based on the interactions they have with brands on social media. Twitter and Facebook are always on putting customers just one click away from being able to reach out with complaints, questions, etc. However, for quite a number of brands, it’s not possible to ‘always be on’ with 24/7 customer support. The lack of resources often prevents them from hiring extra people to take care of the night and weekend shifts.

How can you manage conversations with your customers if 24/7, round-the-clock support isn’t feasible? How can you still manage to exceed the expectations of your customers?

Take a look at these 5 great alternatives to make sure you can still deliver smooth customer interactions over the weekend, during and outside peak hours, and those make or break crisis moments.

1. Being Active When Your Audience Is

It’s as simple as that: just be active when your audience is.

The hours your audience is talking to your brand greatly determines when you yourself need to be actively replying to your customers’ questions. Those hours, when you need to be available, typically depend on the industry you’re in. To get to the bottom of this, you need to monitor when your community is active. Are they usually talking to you during the morning/evening/at night? If this is still a mystery to you, you will quickly understand when you need to provide customer service.

Important Tip: If your brand operates internationally and works with multiple social media teams across the globe, go beyond simply monitoring. Filter on country or language to be able to sift through the data so that each social media team only sees what’s relevant to them.

Still not sure whether you need to provide customer support during the weekend? If that’s when your community is most active, then the answer is, “Yes of course!” If you notice inflow is rather low on Saturday, and especially on Sunday, you can put someone on standby or exclude the weekend from your business hours.

2. Providing Back-Up During Peaks & Crisis Situations

At some points throughout the day, and even throughout the year, there are more conversations than usual. In those cases, outsourcing a part of the work to lighten the load is the perfect alternative to cover periods of time when there’s a significantly higher volume of messages. In the case of telecom companies, for example, they often call upon extra pairs of hands in sudden crisis situations (e.g. failing network connections, total outages, and so forth).

Important Tip: Create special, dynamic forums where you can post regular status updates in times of crisis. As a type of self-service customer care, direct your community to it with helpful links.

3. Being Flexible in Time & Space

In any customer service environment, flexibility is key. It’s a crucial characteristic for employers and employees alike. It really works both ways: the more flexibility you grant employees, the more they will be motivated to do a great job and be flexible in return. That’s why you need to be flexible both in time and space.

Develop trust and reliability with your social media team. If small changes need to be made in people’s schedules, employees need to be flexible enough to step in and switch shifts from time to time. Working with shifts is a great way to provide regular breaks so people have enough time to decompress.

In a lot of cases, the option to work from home is a great alternative to make sure shifts are easily covered. Introducing a BYOD policy (i.e. employees have their own laptop at their disposal) allows employees to work remotely. This is very useful if you want people to work standby during the weekend. Introduce mobile devices and mobile apps, to work on/with either at home or at the office, to provide customer care on the go.

4. Business Hours Don’t Equal Working Hours

Stress is commonplace in a social customer service environment. High volumes of messages need to be dealt with in a timely manner if brands want to meet their targets. When starting a new day, messages have piled up during the night, and there’s usually a higher workload. Brands should create work schemes in terms of workload and not in terms of business hours.

Start half an hour earlier than usual to easily catch up on the messages that filtered into the social inbox during the previous night. After this change, you will easily notice an immediate, positive impact on stress level and response times.

5. Clearly Communicate the Service You Offer

Customers should know what to expect from the service you deliver. What better way to do this than to give your Twitter bio a crucial makeover? The way you describe yourself online says a lot about how you provide customer service, and ultimately, how you do business.

Here are 5 essential elements to include in your Twitter bio to make sure customers know what to expect:

  • include customer care, customer support, or comparable term in your Twitter name
  • state that you deliver customer service in your Twitter bio (e.g. “Customer care team, at your service!”)
  • include business hours: customers need to know when they can access you through social media (e.g. 8am – 8pm, Monday through Friday)
  • communicate about other support channels, and have an alternative available (e.g. website, chat, phone, email, etc.)
  • give your company a human face, and let people know who is part of your social customer care team

Want to learn more about these alternatives in-depth? Don’t hesitate to check out our dedicated eBook to make sure you’re maximizing your social customer service efforts.

The post 5 Great Alternatives to 24/7 Social Customer Service appeared first on Engagor.

5 Great Alternatives to 24/7 Social Customer Service

Customers are making key buying decisions based on the interactions they have with brands on social media. Twitter and Facebook are always on putting customers just one click away from being able to reach out with complaints, questions, etc. However, for quite a number of brands, it’s not possible to ‘always be on’ with 24/7 customer support. The lack of resources often prevents them from hiring extra people to take care of the night and weekend shifts.

How can you manage conversations with your customers if 24/7, round-the-clock support isn’t feasible? How can you still manage to exceed the expectations of your customers?

Take a look at these 5 great alternatives to make sure you can still deliver smooth customer interactions over the weekend, during and outside peak hours, and those make or break crisis moments.

1. Being Active When Your Audience Is

It’s as simple as that: just be active when your audience is.

The hours your audience is talking to your brand greatly determines when you yourself need to be actively replying to your customers’ questions. Those hours, when you need to be available, typically depend on the industry you’re in. To get to the bottom of this, you need to monitor when your community is active. Are they usually talking to you during the morning/evening/at night? If this is still a mystery to you, you will quickly understand when you need to provide customer service.

Important Tip: If your brand operates internationally and works with multiple social media teams across the globe, go beyond simply monitoring. Filter on country or language to be able to sift through the data so that each social media team only sees what’s relevant to them.

Still not sure whether you need to provide customer support during the weekend? If that’s when your community is most active, then the answer is, “Yes of course!” If you notice inflow is rather low on Saturday, and especially on Sunday, you can put someone on standby or exclude the weekend from your business hours.

2. Providing Back-Up During Peaks & Crisis Situations

At some points throughout the day, and even throughout the year, there are more conversations than usual. In those cases, outsourcing a part of the work to lighten the load is the perfect alternative to cover periods of time when there’s a significantly higher volume of messages. In the case of telecom companies, for example, they often call upon extra pairs of hands in sudden crisis situations (e.g. failing network connections, total outages, and so forth).

Important Tip: Create special, dynamic forums where you can post regular status updates in times of crisis. As a type of self-service customer care, direct your community to it with helpful links.

3. Being Flexible in Time & Space

In any customer service environment, flexibility is key. It’s a crucial characteristic for employers and employees alike. It really works both ways: the more flexibility you grant employees, the more they will be motivated to do a great job and be flexible in return. That’s why you need to be flexible both in time and space.

Develop trust and reliability with your social media team. If small changes need to be made in people’s schedules, employees need to be flexible enough to step in and switch shifts from time to time. Working with shifts is a great way to provide regular breaks so people have enough time to decompress.

In a lot of cases, the option to work from home is a great alternative to make sure shifts are easily covered. Introducing a BYOD policy (i.e. employees have their own laptop at their disposal) allows employees to work remotely. This is very useful if you want people to work standby during the weekend. Introduce mobile devices and mobile apps, to work on/with either at home or at the office, to provide customer care on the go.

4. Business Hours Don’t Equal Working Hours

Stress is commonplace in a social customer service environment. High volumes of messages need to be dealt with in a timely manner if brands want to meet their targets. When starting a new day, messages have piled up during the night, and there’s usually a higher workload. Brands should create work schemes in terms of workload and not in terms of business hours.

Start half an hour earlier than usual to easily catch up on the messages that filtered into the social inbox during the previous night. After this change, you will easily notice an immediate, positive impact on stress level and response times.

5. Clearly Communicate the Service You Offer

Customers should know what to expect from the service you deliver. What better way to do this than to give your Twitter bio a crucial makeover? The way you describe yourself online says a lot about how you provide customer service, and ultimately, how you do business.

Here are 5 essential elements to include in your Twitter bio to make sure customers know what to expect:

  • include customer care, customer support, or comparable term in your Twitter name
  • state that you deliver customer service in your Twitter bio (e.g. “Customer care team, at your service!”)
  • include business hours: customers need to know when they can access you through social media (e.g. 8am – 8pm, Monday through Friday)
  • communicate about other support channels, and have an alternative available (e.g. website, chat, phone, email, etc.)
  • give your company a human face, and let people know who is part of your social customer care team

Want to learn more about these alternatives in-depth? Don’t hesitate to check out our dedicated eBook to make sure you’re maximizing your social customer service efforts.

The post 5 Great Alternatives to 24/7 Social Customer Service appeared first on Engagor.

5 Great Alternatives to 24/7 Social Customer Service

Customers are making key buying decisions based on the interactions they have with brands on social media. Twitter and Facebook are always on putting customers just one click away from being able to reach out with complaints, questions, etc. However, for quite a number of brands, it’s not possible to ‘always be on’ with 24/7 customer support. The lack of resources often prevents them from hiring extra people to take care of the night and weekend shifts.

How can you manage conversations with your customers if 24/7, round-the-clock support isn’t feasible? How can you still manage to exceed the expectations of your customers?

Take a look at these 5 great alternatives to make sure you can still deliver smooth customer interactions over the weekend, during and outside peak hours, and those make or break crisis moments.

1. Being Active When Your Audience Is

It’s as simple as that: just be active when your audience is.

The hours your audience is talking to your brand greatly determines when you yourself need to be actively replying to your customers’ questions. Those hours, when you need to be available, typically depend on the industry you’re in. To get to the bottom of this, you need to monitor when your community is active. Are they usually talking to you during the morning/evening/at night? If this is still a mystery to you, you will quickly understand when you need to provide customer service.

Important Tip: If your brand operates internationally and works with multiple social media teams across the globe, go beyond simply monitoring. Filter on country or language to be able to sift through the data so that each social media team only sees what’s relevant to them.

Still not sure whether you need to provide customer support during the weekend? If that’s when your community is most active, then the answer is, “Yes of course!” If you notice inflow is rather low on Saturday, and especially on Sunday, you can put someone on standby or exclude the weekend from your business hours.

2. Providing Back-Up During Peaks & Crisis Situations

At some points throughout the day, and even throughout the year, there are more conversations than usual. In those cases, outsourcing a part of the work to lighten the load is the perfect alternative to cover periods of time when there’s a significantly higher volume of messages. In the case of telecom companies, for example, they often call upon extra pairs of hands in sudden crisis situations (e.g. failing network connections, total outages, and so forth).

Important Tip: Create special, dynamic forums where you can post regular status updates in times of crisis. As a type of self-service customer care, direct your community to it with helpful links.

3. Being Flexible in Time & Space

In any customer service environment, flexibility is key. It’s a crucial characteristic for employers and employees alike. It really works both ways: the more flexibility you grant employees, the more they will be motivated to do a great job and be flexible in return. That’s why you need to be flexible both in time and space.

Develop trust and reliability with your social media team. If small changes need to be made in people’s schedules, employees need to be flexible enough to step in and switch shifts from time to time. Working with shifts is a great way to provide regular breaks so people have enough time to decompress.

In a lot of cases, the option to work from home is a great alternative to make sure shifts are easily covered. Introducing a BYOD policy (i.e. employees have their own laptop at their disposal) allows employees to work remotely. This is very useful if you want people to work standby during the weekend. Introduce mobile devices and mobile apps, to work on/with either at home or at the office, to provide customer care on the go.

4. Business Hours Don’t Equal Working Hours

Stress is commonplace in a social customer service environment. High volumes of messages need to be dealt with in a timely manner if brands want to meet their targets. When starting a new day, messages have piled up during the night, and there’s usually a higher workload. Brands should create work schemes in terms of workload and not in terms of business hours.

Start half an hour earlier than usual to easily catch up on the messages that filtered into the social inbox during the previous night. After this change, you will easily notice an immediate, positive impact on stress level and response times.

5. Clearly Communicate the Service You Offer

Customers should know what to expect from the service you deliver. What better way to do this than to give your Twitter bio a crucial makeover? The way you describe yourself online says a lot about how you provide customer service, and ultimately, how you do business.

Here are 5 essential elements to include in your Twitter bio to make sure customers know what to expect:

  • include customer care, customer support, or comparable term in your Twitter name
  • state that you deliver customer service in your Twitter bio (e.g. “Customer care team, at your service!”)
  • include business hours: customers need to know when they can access you through social media (e.g. 8am – 8pm, Monday through Friday)
  • communicate about other support channels, and have an alternative available (e.g. website, chat, phone, email, etc.)
  • give your company a human face, and let people know who is part of your social customer care team

Want to learn more about these alternatives in-depth? Don’t hesitate to check out our dedicated eBook to make sure you’re maximizing your social customer service efforts.

The post 5 Great Alternatives to 24/7 Social Customer Service appeared first on Engagor.

Engagor Now Allows Users to Comment on Instagram Posts

instagram logo

These days, Instagram is all the rage. A lot of brands use it to connect with their customers. Nowadays, unlike any other social media channel, Instagram scores high in engagement. Drumroll please, because we have some exciting news to share with you!

Users in Engagor will now be able to comment on Instagram photos/videos directly within Engagor. Instagram’s API still doesn’t allow us to upload pictures, however, as of today, COMMENTING on Instagram posts from within your Engagor inbox is possible. At Engagor, we continuously keep our eyes on expanding Instagram functionalities within our platform to make sure users can take advantage of them as soon as they’re available.

Here’s a small overview of how you can now reply to Instagram posts (photos/videos).

1. This is how we track an Instagram post (PS: uploading pictures is only possible through their native app)

Screen Shot 2015-03-25 at 17.18.36 (1)

2. And here’s how you can now comment on Instagram posts that have landed in your social inbox:

Instagram Post Comment

Why doesn’t Instagram allow Engagor to post photos/videos?

Instagram prides itself on being the ultimate social media channel to upload pictures and connect with your brand’s followers on the go. That is why at this point no external source other than their own, native app has the possibility to upload pictures.

Next Steps for Engagor Users

Ready to give commenting on an Instagram post a shot? Don’t hesitate to check our dedicated support article for more useful information on all the Instagram functionalities in Engagor. If you want to start using this, please make sure to follow Instagram’s posting guidelines.

While we are talking Instagram anyway, here is some more exciting news from Instagram on their end: the visual social network just launched Layout, a new app that lets you easily combine multiple photos into a single image. According to Instagram, it’s a fun and simple way to share more creative photos.

The post Engagor Now Allows Users to Comment on Instagram Posts appeared first on Engagor.

Engagor Now Allows Users to Comment on Instagram Posts

instagram logo

These days, Instagram is all the rage. A lot of brands use it to connect with their customers. Nowadays, unlike any other social media channel, Instagram scores high in engagement. Drumroll please, because we have some exciting news to share with you!

Users in Engagor will now be able to comment on Instagram photos/videos directly within Engagor. Instagram’s API still doesn’t allow us to upload pictures, however, as of today, COMMENTING on Instagram posts from within your Engagor inbox is possible. At Engagor, we continuously keep our eyes on expanding Instagram functionalities within our platform to make sure users can take advantage of them as soon as they’re available.

Here’s a small overview of how you can now reply to Instagram posts (photos/videos).

1. This is how we track an Instagram post (PS: uploading pictures is only possible through their native app)

Screen Shot 2015-03-25 at 17.18.36 (1)

2. And here’s how you can now comment on Instagram posts that have landed in your social inbox:

Instagram Post Comment

Why doesn’t Instagram allow Engagor to post photos/videos?

Instagram prides itself on being the ultimate social media channel to upload pictures and connect with your brand’s followers on the go. That is why at this point no external source other than their own, native app has the possibility to upload pictures.

Next Steps for Engagor Users

Ready to give commenting on an Instagram post a shot? Don’t hesitate to check our dedicated support article for more useful information on all the Instagram functionalities in Engagor. If you want to start using this, please make sure to follow Instagram’s posting guidelines.

While we are talking Instagram anyway, here is some more exciting news from Instagram on their end: the visual social network just launched Layout, a new app that lets you easily combine multiple photos into a single image. According to Instagram, it’s a fun and simple way to share more creative photos.

The post Engagor Now Allows Users to Comment on Instagram Posts appeared first on Engagor.

Engagor Now Allows Users to Comment on Instagram Posts

instagram logo

These days, Instagram is all the rage. A lot of brands use it to connect with their customers. Nowadays, unlike any other social media channel, Instagram scores high in engagement. Drumroll please, because we have some exciting news to share with you!

Users in Engagor will now be able to comment on Instagram photos/videos directly within Engagor. Instagram’s API still doesn’t allow us to upload pictures, however, as of today, COMMENTING on Instagram posts from within your Engagor inbox is possible. At Engagor, we continuously keep our eyes on expanding Instagram functionalities within our platform to make sure users can take advantage of them as soon as they’re available.

Here’s a small overview of how you can now reply to Instagram posts (photos/videos).

1. This is how we track an Instagram post (PS: uploading pictures is only possible through their native app)

Screen Shot 2015-03-25 at 17.18.36 (1)

2. And here’s how you can now comment on Instagram posts that have landed in your social inbox:

Instagram Post Comment

Why doesn’t Instagram allow Engagor to post photos/videos?

Instagram prides itself on being the ultimate social media channel to upload pictures and connect with your brand’s followers on the go. That is why at this point no external source other than their own, native app has the possibility to upload pictures.

Next Steps for Engagor Users

Ready to give commenting on an Instagram post a shot? Don’t hesitate to check our dedicated support article for more useful information on all the Instagram functionalities in Engagor. If you want to start using this, please make sure to follow Instagram’s posting guidelines.

While we are talking Instagram anyway, here is some more exciting news from Instagram on their end: the visual social network just launched Layout, a new app that lets you easily combine multiple photos into a single image. According to Instagram, it’s a fun and simple way to share more creative photos.

The post Engagor Now Allows Users to Comment on Instagram Posts appeared first on Engagor.

Is Your Brand Ready for Social?

visual overwelming social media

Nowadays, more than 85% of brands are on social media. However, is your brand truly ready for social to maximize your efforts on social media? Although most brands have social profiles, not all brands actively use them let alone have a clear plan and strategy to fall back on. Trying to wrap your head around it can be very overwhelming. Beginning on social media seems like an overwhelming challenge to take on. Some brands are getting cold feet and have no clue where to start.

No need to worry! No matter which stage your brand is in today, set aside some valuable time to reflect on what you’re currently doing on social media. Are you getting the results you hoped for? Are you stuck in a rut and feel like you could use a new approach?

How can you make your brand TRULY ready for social?

Maybe you just need to look at your social media presence from a fresh, new perspective? Take a look at the 3 steps we have created to help you successfully kick off your efforts on social media.

Step 1: Observe & Discover

First and foremost, you need a complete overview of your current situation. How are people already talking about my brand? What are my competitors doing? Tracking the right keywords enables you to gain deeper insights into the needs and wants of your community before you can engage with your customers.

Observing your social media presence and monitoring the right keywords allows you to:

  • Discover the main points of engagement (i.e. WHAT are my customers talking about?)
  • Determine the frequency/volume of incoming mentions
  • Better understand your product/brand so that you can stake steps to improve it
  • Track relevant trending topics to grasp what’s relevant in your industry

Step 2: Plan, Plan, Plan

Compare building your social media presence with building your business. It takes a lot of blood, sweat, and tears before your efforts really pay off. Do you already know what you want to achieve on social media? Are you looking for ways to spike your follower growth, increase customer engagement, or take on social customer service? Decide which objectives you want to achieve, and don’t be afraid to write it all down. The more you’re able to create realistic objectives for your brand, the more you will be able to keep an eye on your activities.

Your customers appreciate it when you take the time to acknowledge their feedback and LISTEN to what they are saying. Once you recognize the value of social media and how it can benefit your brand, you can start using it to grow your business.

Step 3: Set Up Your Strategy, Off You Go!

So how exactly are you going to execute your plan? That’s where a straightforward strategy comes in!

Once you’ve got your plan, there’s no point in waiting. Social media changes at the speed of light! The longer you wait, the more catching up you will need to do. Social media shouldn’t be scary or intimidating, it should be fun! If you have the right attitude and feel confident enough with the right preparation to take off on social media, you can easily turn a negative experience into a positive one. And isn’t that exactly the point of social media nowadays?

Don’t be afraid to make mistakes because everyone does at some point! Be confident that you’ll know what to do no matter what the scenario. Start talking and engaging with your customers, and learn from each conversation.

The post Is Your Brand Ready for Social? appeared first on Engagor.

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